Josh Jambon Works Within Precepts of the Outer Continental Shelf Act

The offshore oil and gas industry is an important source of the oil and gas supply of the United States.  Important sources of fossil energy have been found off the coasts of Louisiana, Texas, California and Alaska.  Josh Jambon supports the development of these offshore fields through his company Jambon Marine Services which rents and leases offshore service vessels.  Jambon is proud to support the oil and gas industry in its offshore exploration, and is also aware of the many environmental concerns which have led to the restrictions and regulations on offshore drilling efforts which he respects in his role as a supplier of service vessels.  

4425750-dbac658b-1024The issue of ownership of the minerals under the offshore seabed has long been an issue of contention in Josh Jambon’s native Louisiana.  A ruling by the Supreme Court in 1947 stated that the seabed off the California coast, and by extension the seabed off the coasts of Texas and Louisiana, was owned by the federal government.    This ruling invalidated state leases over active offshore oil fields.   The Submerged Land Act of 1953 established the ownership of the state of the seabed within 3 miles of shore.  The Outer Continental Shelf Act established federal jurisdiction over the seabed farther offshore.  Federal offshore leases allow development and production rights for the federal seabed.  Only Texas and the west coast of Florida have extended ownership of the seabed out to 9 nautical miles.  President Reagan proclaimed that the United States Exclusive Economic Zone extends to 200 nautical miles from the shore, while the Law of the Sea, which has yet to be ratified, also establishes the control of each nation for its Exclusive Economic Zone to 200 miles from its shores.  The International Court of Justice has also adjudicated disputes over EEZ boundaries, while the Law of the Sea allows an extension of up to 350 miles from the shore under certain circumstances.

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Josh Jambon Totally Dedicated to Advancement of South Lafourche

The support and encouragement which Josh Jambon has provided his native parish of Lafourche in Louisiana has continued unabated from his early days at South Lafourche High School, where his 1977 graduation was accompanied by the thrill of being part of his school’s second state football championship, the South Lafourche/Bonnabel 3AAA victory of 1977. Inspired by this glory so early in life, Jambon has retained his loyalty to his high school throughout his career, sponsoring the reunions of the 1977 football team, donating generously toward the needs of South Lafourche students, maintaining his memberships in the South Lafourche Alumni Association, the South Lafourche Boosters Club and supporting the Tiger Athletic Foundation, as well as sponsoring the Ralph Pere scholarship and the Faron Chaisson Memorial Scholarship.   This extended association with the organizations and friends of his youth speaks volumes about the inner man that is Jambon: loyal, dedicated to his hometown, aware of the needs of his fellow citizens and generous in supporting the home and institutions he loves.

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Josh Jambon also participates in the community life of Lafourche Parish, having previously served as president of the Sun Fest and Pirate Days in Grand Isle, Louisiana.  Louisiana is known as a Sportsman’s Paradise, with fishing and birding habitat, and Grand Isle is Louisiana’s only inhabited barrier island.  Beaches, wildlife and beautiful view of the Gulf of Mexico are married with the southern hospitality and gourmet seafood dishes which Louisiana is known for.  Josh Jambon of Lafourche Parish has enjoyed the beauty of Grand Isle on trips to enjoy over seven miles of public white sand beaches and the Butterfly Dome, which features tours to view native butterflies and plants in their habitat.  Grand Isle also offers Elmer’s Island Wildlife Refuge, a state-owned barrier beachfront, and Grand Isle State Park with beaches, a fishing pier, trails and overnight camping, as well as the Grand Isle Birding Trail, with five bird viewing locations on a two-mile trail.