Josh Jambon’s Modern Ocean Class Vessels Offer Creature Comforts

Jambon Marine Services is very aware of the efficacy of providing a platform service vessel as part of its fleet offerings for the support of offshore oil and gas platforms, and Josh Jambon has his eye on a 275-foot service vessel which will expand the efficiency of his fleet.  Platform supply vessels, or PSVs, are designed to conform to the special needs of oil and gas platforms, and are essential for a number of tasks related to platform drilling.  Most PSVs are 50 to 100 meters long, and primarily move goods, tools, personnel and equipment between offshore structures and from platforms to shore and back.  The most up to date platform supply vessels are rigged with Class 1 and Class 2 Dynamic Positioning Systems.  These highly convertible ships transport cargo tanks for drilling mud and macerated cement, diesel fuel, chemicals and the potable and non-potable water so vital for use on offshore platforms.  Platform Service Vessels also return chemicals and other supplies which require recycling and disposal.  

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Platform service vessels such as the 275-foot vessel considered for acquisition at Jambon Marine Supply carry specialty tools on their large decks and bulk cargo in below deck tanks.  PSVs may be refitted for specialty jobs, such as firefighting equipment, oil containment and specialized recovery equipment for emergency situations such as oil spills at sea.  PSVs may also be fitted with the tools, chemicals and personnel to redesign the pumping capabilities of performing wells to increase their output.  Josh Jambon’s acquisition of a platform service vessel will also provide additional jobs on crew, as PSVs may carry operating crews up to 36 people.  Crews in platform service capacities will work and live aboard ship for anywhere from 4 to 6 weeks at a time, with comparable time off periods.  Depending on the number of offshore destinations scheduled for the PSV, crew may be aboard ship for 3 months or more.  Work shifts for crew members are scheduled for 12 hour durations.  Platform supply vessels have a bridge for navigation and ship operation, machinery holds, living quarters, galley and mess areas.  Work areas and even entertainment sections may be extant, and the large deck of platform vessels is sometimes used for portable housing when necessary.

Josh Jambon’s addition of a platform service vessel to his Jambon Marine Services fleet will provide yet another dimension to the vast international fleet of ships available for rent and lease from JMS.  Offshore oil and gas projects depend upon platform service vessels for a variety of essential tasks, and the crew aboard PSVs lives and works on the ships for extended periods.  The living quarters of a large PSV will provide cabins, offices, lockers and personal storage space.  Sinks, showers and toilets are part of common accommodations, while officers’ quarters often have work desks and private bathrooms.  Newer evolutions of these vessels provide satellite TV and Wi-Fi hookups.  The galley of PSVs has space for provision storage lasting into months at sea, with walk in freezers and refrigerators, commercial stoves, sinks, storage and counter space.  Coffee makers, toasters, microwaves are readily available for the relief of a crew which often works in 12 hour shifts.

Ocean class DP 1 and DP 2 vessels of the type leased and rented to support offshore oil and gas exploration by international company Jambon Marine Service are twin screw driven with controllable pitch propellers and independent high lift rudders.  Hulls are welded steel and vessels are prepared for long range ocean towing, dynamic positions, firefighting and general purpose use.  Transverse and longitudinal framed bulkheads are designed with double hulls enclosing oil and oil trace tanks.

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Josh Jambon: The Secrets To Building Relationships In Business

As the head of Jambon Marine Service, which aims to provide oil and gas transportation vessels around the world, Josh Jambon must be capable of building and maintain relationships with people from a wide array of cultural backgrounds. Networking is something that many entrepreneurs struggle with, particularly those who are not confident in social settings or have yet to build reputations within their industries. These pointers should make building the business relationships that can lead to opportunities easier.

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Don’t Promise Too Much

In their rush to impress as many people as possible, many entrepreneurs make the mistake of promising more than they are capable of delivering. This can lead to broken promises and the development of a poor reputation within the business community, which in turn will limit your access to new opportunities. Be realistic about your current status and understand that many business relationships take time to mature, so don’t try to deliver everything at once.

Use Social Media

The advent of social media has been a boon for young entrepreneurs, as it provides them with more direct access to the key influencers and decision-makers in their industries. Social media sites also offer people the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of their industries, thus establishing themselves as authorities, plus it allows for easier communication with professionals from all over the globe.

Identify Shared Goals

Business professionals, like Josh Jambon, often look to build relationships with those who share similar ideals and goals. If you aim to build a network, you first need to understand your own goals in business. What do you want to achieve individually and where do you want your company to be? Once you can answer these questions you can start looking for fellow professionals who share similar aspirations and ethics, allowing for the creation of relationships that are built on foundations of trust and mutual goals.

Josh Jambon Familiar With Safety of Life at Sea Treaty

Josh Jambon of Jambon Marine Services complies with all safety standards of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, or SOLAS.  An international maritime treaty, SOLAS requirements apply to signatory flag states, ensuring that ships registered by signatories are in compliance with safety standards of construction, equipment and operation.  Current SOLAS standards were set in May 1980.  162 states are contracted to comply by the current International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea standards, covering around 99 percent of all merchant ships in the world.  The first SOLAS standards arose in 1914 after the Titanic disaster, mandating minimum numbers of lifeboats, radio contacts, and emergency procedures and equipment.  However, the first treaty was delayed due to the beginning of World War I.  The 1929 and 1948 standard versions were adopted.

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The 1960 standards as set forth by the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea treaty were a step forward, with regulations dealing with modern technology in maritime shipping, while the 1974 Convention adopted procedures which enabled SOLAS to take effect more efficiently.  Josh Jambon recognizes the 1974 standards, updated and amended since that time, as per its amendment to use metric units only in 1975, and the 1988 changes to replace Morse code with the Global Maritime Distress Safety System.

Josh Jambon of Jambon Marine Services abides by all International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea requirements, endeavoring to maintain compliance with all safety standards as they pertain to construction, equipment and operation.  Chapter Five of the treaty manual applies to all sea vessels, whether they are private yachts, small local craft, commercial vessels or international cruises.  The Global Maritime Distress Safety System requires radio equipment, emergency radio beacons and transponders for search and rescue for all international voyages.  All planned sea voyages are required to assess weather forecasts, tides, crew capability and other possible threats to navigation.  Vessel masters must also render aide and assistance to vessels in distress and have mastery of the use of lifesaving signals and messages.  

Jambon Marine Services and owner Josh Jambon look forward to the latest generation of platform service vessels with diesel/LNG transport capabilities.  An LNG tanker is especially designed for the transport of liquefied natural gas.  The first LNG tanker Methane Pioneer departed from the Louisiana Gulf coast in 1959, delivering liquefied natural gas to the United Kingdom.  Today, LNG ships which carry 9,400,000 cubic feet of LNG sail across the world’s seas on a current fleet of 193.  Typical LNG carriers concentrate the tanks along the centerline of the vessel, with ballast tanks, cofferdams and voids surrounding the center tanks.  A pump tower hangs from the top of each tank, where the main cargo pumps and a spray pump is used for pumping out LNG for fuel or for cooling down cargo tanks.

Offshore support vessels, known in the vernacular as OSVs, are a specialized form of maritime ship customized for use by the offshore oil and gas industry.  Proliferation of the offshore support vessel market is driven by demand for oil.  High oil prices encourage energy companies to increase their offshore oil and gas drilling projects, and therefore the need for offshore support vessels rises.  The search for, called exploration and production (E&P), new undersea drill sites for untapped sources of oil and gas are the first stop in the ultimate values assigned to fossil energy.  Complex, fraught with dangers and expensive to execute, offshore drill projects are a devastating loss both economically and perhaps environmentally if the effort fails.  Offshore platform service vessels must be customized and economical.

Josh Jambon: The Qualities That All Entrepreneurs Must Possess

Josh Jambon is an experienced entrepreneur who has been involved in the creation and success of businesses in a variety of sectors throughout his career. Though he is now involved in the oil and gas sector, he also has experienced previous successes in marine supply and property development. In achieving this, it has become apparent that he possesses a number of key qualities that all entrepreneurs must share if they are to achieve their goals in business.

Determination

Most entrepreneurs are very familiar with the word “no”. It is a word that you may hear often in your attempts to establish a business or bring a new product to the market and it can have negative effects on your drive and ambition to achieve something beyond the scope of the average person. Successful entrepreneurs are both realistic in their ambitions and able to recognize when their ideas can succeed, making them determined to see them through until they reach their potential.

The Thirst For Knowledge

Stagnation is the enemy of the true entrepreneur, as it means a failure to adapt to changing trends and the inability to innovate in-line with the needs of customers. In order to avoid stagnation, entrepreneurs must dedicate themselves to continued learning and should take advantage of any educational opportunities that are presented to them.

The Desire To Win

“I truly love to win in business,” says Josh Jambon. “Money is not what drives me. Winning is.” This is an attitude that budding entrepreneurs need to adopt, as the sole pursuit of money can blind them to the advancements their competitors are making or the potential issues that clients may have with the company. Winning, in business terms, involves staying ahead of your competition and ensuring the service you provide to customers is so good that they won’t consider using other suppliers.

Josh Jambon: The Qualities That All Entrepreneurs Must Possess

Josh Jambon is an experienced entrepreneur who has been involved in the creation and success of businesses in a variety of sectors throughout his career. Though he is now involved in the oil and gas sector, he also has experienced previous successes in marine supply and property development. In achieving this, it has become apparent that he possesses a number of key qualities that all entrepreneurs must share if they are to achieve their goals in business.

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Determination  Most entrepreneurs are very familiar with the word “no”. It is a word that you may hear often in your attempts to establish a business or bring a new product to the market and it can have negative effects on your drive and ambition to achieve something beyond the scope of the average person. Successful entrepreneurs are both realistic in their ambitions and able to recognize when their ideas can succeed, making them determined to see them through until they reach their potential.

The Thirst For Knowledge  Stagnation is the enemy of the true entrepreneur, as it means a failure to adapt to changing trends and the inability to innovate in-line with the needs of customers. In order to avoid stagnation, entrepreneurs must dedicate themselves to continued learning and should take advantage of any educational opportunities that are presented to them.

The Desire To Win  “I truly love to win in business,” says Josh Jambon. “Money is not what drives me. Winning is.” This is an attitude that budding entrepreneurs need to adopt, as the sole pursuit of money can blind them to the advancements their competitors are making or the potential issues that clients may have with the company. Winning, in business terms, involves staying ahead of your competition and ensuring the service you provide to customers is so good that they won’t consider using other suppliers.

Josh Jambon a Discerning Lover of Scotch

As opposed to the genuine Scotch whisk(e)y which aficionados like Josh Jambon may prefer, American whisk(e)y must conform to a variety of regulations, depending on the product being produced.  Bourbon comes from fermented mash which is not less than 51% corn and whose distillation proof cannot be higher than 160.  Bourbon must be matured in new oak barrels, while blended American whisk(e)y must be made with a minimum of 20% whiskey aged two or more years.  Tennessee whisk(e)y is much the same except it is charcoal filtered, so it cannot be labeled as a bourbon.

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Scotch whisky actually made in Scotland and preferred by Scotch purists like Josh Jambon is manufactured according to legal requirements, so that connoisseurs like Josh Jambon may be guaranteed the real article.  It must be made from malted barley, which distinguishes it from other commercial versions made from wheat and rye.  Real Scotch whisky has five categories: single malt, single grain, blended malt, blended grain and blended.  Every variety must be aged in oak barrels for a minimum of three years, and age statements on every bottle must state the age of the youngest whisky in the product.  The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland first mention Scotch whiskey in 1495, distilled by Friar John Cor at Lindores Abbey.   

Today’s Scotch whisky with the fine tastes and aromas which distinguish it to Scotch lovers like Josh Jambon, is regulated by the Scotch Whisky Regulations of 2009, which state that true Scotch whisky must be produced at a Scotland distillery from water and malted barley which has been rendered there into a mash, has been fermented there with endogenous enzyme systems with yeast only.  The true product must be distilled at 190 proof or less and must have been completely matured in a warehouse in Scotland in oak (185 US gallons) for a minimum of three years.  The finished Scotch whisky product must retain the color, aroma and taste of the raw materials used in its production and must contain no added substances beyond water and caramel coloring.  Genuine Scotch whisky must have a minimum proof of at least 80 US.

As a connoisseur of genuine Scotch whiskey, Josh Jambon would certainly have educated himself regarding the information included on a genuine Scotch label, such as production, age, bottling and ownership.  On a proper Scotch whisky label a complete listing of the malt or grain whiskies is given.  The term single cask would indicate that the bottle comes from one cask only.  

Josh Jambon Works Within Precepts of the Outer Continental Shelf Act

The offshore oil and gas industry is an important source of the oil and gas supply of the United States.  Important sources of fossil energy have been found off the coasts of Louisiana, Texas, California and Alaska.  Josh Jambon supports the development of these offshore fields through his company Jambon Marine Services which rents and leases offshore service vessels.  Jambon is proud to support the oil and gas industry in its offshore exploration, and is also aware of the many environmental concerns which have led to the restrictions and regulations on offshore drilling efforts which he respects in his role as a supplier of service vessels.  

4425750-dbac658b-1024The issue of ownership of the minerals under the offshore seabed has long been an issue of contention in Josh Jambon’s native Louisiana.  A ruling by the Supreme Court in 1947 stated that the seabed off the California coast, and by extension the seabed off the coasts of Texas and Louisiana, was owned by the federal government.    This ruling invalidated state leases over active offshore oil fields.   The Submerged Land Act of 1953 established the ownership of the state of the seabed within 3 miles of shore.  The Outer Continental Shelf Act established federal jurisdiction over the seabed farther offshore.  Federal offshore leases allow development and production rights for the federal seabed.  Only Texas and the west coast of Florida have extended ownership of the seabed out to 9 nautical miles.  President Reagan proclaimed that the United States Exclusive Economic Zone extends to 200 nautical miles from the shore, while the Law of the Sea, which has yet to be ratified, also establishes the control of each nation for its Exclusive Economic Zone to 200 miles from its shores.  The International Court of Justice has also adjudicated disputes over EEZ boundaries, while the Law of the Sea allows an extension of up to 350 miles from the shore under certain circumstances.